For-Profit Approach to World News at GlobalPost – NYTimes.com

Reporting for profit? That’s a new idea. At least to those of us who spent most of college desperately trying to stretch newspaper salaries to cover the essential collegiate trifecta of tuition, rent and beer. Most of us ended up deciding not to go into journalism after graduation, choosing instead to pursue careers in everything from event planning to teaching and, of course, my choice — navigating the intricacies of the interwebs. Why did we decide not to make our livelihoods as globe-trotting, fedora-wearing newsies? Simply put, nobody thought there would be much of a livelihood to be had in that industry. In fact, even the two Daily Nexus coworkers I had who graduated hell-bent on finding work in belly of that dying beast known as journalism eventually ended up giving up. One of them is a production assistant at a TV show now, the other is wasting her considerable talents at a small-town newspaper, desperate to escape and looking to the LSATS to get her out of news and into a career that might actually afford her the luxury of being able to pay for groceries without a credit card. Clearly, it’s time for the journalism industry to come to terms with changing tastes, shifting paradigms and groundbreaking new technologies. The music and movie moguls have to do that too, not to mention the folks sitting in their Time Warner offices who seem to think I’m not going to cancel my cable subscription the second my iPhone gets full flash capabilities. But, I have to admit, there’s something kind of icky about the idea of a pay-for-play news service, where the people get to “sit in on the editorial meetings.” Having worked at many newspapers over the last few years, and having grown up with two parents who were in the news business, I have to admit that I do have a bit of a bias about ‘journalism by the people.’ There’s something to be said for the fact that professional journalists are just that — professionals. They know how to separate fact from opinion, how to differentiate a real news story from a publicity-hungry press release, how to  tell the difference between a credible source and one that’s not, how to tell a story from all angles and — perhaps most importantly — how to string a sentence together. How much of those things will we have to give up when we start letting the people who can afford to pay for the news dictate how the news is written? Or what it’s written about? Sure, I love the idea of reporters finally making a little money off their reportage, but before we start letting just anyone in the on ed-board meeting, maybe we should think about why the meetings were closed-door in the first place.

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3 thoughts on “For-Profit Approach to World News at GlobalPost – NYTimes.com

  1. Learn something new everyday\Well thought out post\Thought I would drop in for a quick comment. Been lurking around on your blog for some time now…
    Just thought I would throw a reply on one of your posts to let you know I exist 🙂

  2. Pingback: Popular People » Blog Archive » Rebuilding Gaza To Raze it Again « American Armageddon Judgement Day

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